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By Scott Walbeck





100 years. Any way you slice it, a century is a significant piece of time. Generations come and go during stretches of 100 years. Technology changes lifestyles significantly, and sports rise and fall in popularity.

With the announcement this week of a multitude of upcoming events and celebrations to mark the Green Bay Packers 100th season, it got me thinking about the team and how truly special its 100 year story is, and about something that really bothered me.

It involves shirts. Specifically, Packers shirts that read established 1921. You see, 1921-2018 is a total of 98 seasons of football, not 100. Why then are the Packers celebrating their centennial this season?

That’s because the Pack was actually established one year before the start of the National Football League in 1919. The NFL itself did not come into existence until 1920, and Green Bay jumped into the league in 1921. So the NFL was established in 1920, the Green Bay Packers joined in 1921 and the shirts are wrong, very wrong.

These two seasons simply cannot be overlooked.

Who could forget about the 85-0 win over the Oshkosh Professionals in 1919, or the devastating season-ending 6-0 loss to the Beloit Fairies that kept Green Bay from an undefeated season? 1920 started with hard fought 3-3 tie with the Chicago Boosters and also ended with only one loss and this time it was those darn Fairies again, this time by a score of 14-3.

Many of you may not know the year, but are familiar with the story. The Packers were organized on Aug. 11, 1919 at yes, a newspaper. Specifically the dingy second-floor editorial rooms of the old Green Bay Press-Gazette building on Cherry Street in downtown Green Bay.

I picture something akin to the upstairs archives of the Antigo Daily Journal, perhaps with an added cloud of cigarette smoke and Fred Berner replaced with Press-Gazette editor George Calhoun, myself swapped out by a slightly better athlete, Earl Curly Lambeau, back home after leaving college at Notre Dame, where he played for the legendary Knute Rockne.

Just two days later in the Aug. 13 edition of the Press-Gazette, the announcement of the team was made, noting the Indian Packing Co., Lambeau’s employer, would sponsor the team and it would be referred to as the Packers. Team colors would be blue and gold, designed to look like the threads donned by Notre Dame.

Prospective players were listed as former standouts at Green Bay East and West high schools, with 20 making the final cut. The Press-Gazette proclaimed, It will be the strongest aggregation of pigskins chasers that has ever been gathered together in this city.

Lambeau would eventually be elected captain of the team, with Calhoun as manager.

And to think urban legend said it all started with a chance encounter at a downtown Green Bay street corner between Lambeau and Calhoun, with Lambeau mentioning starting a semi-pro team, after Calhoun recognized him from his days as a star at East High.

The 1919 and 1920 seasons saw the Packers play mostly against neighboring towns in Wisconsin and the Upper Peninsula of Michigan including the afore mentioned teams, at Hagermeister Park, an open field with no bleachers and fans passing the hat to raise money to keep the team operating.

The NFL, then known as the American Professional Football Association awarded a franchise to Green Bay on Aug. 27, 1921. The Acme Packing Company had purchased the Indian Packing Co. eight months earlier and the team began its pro football run as the Acme Packers.

The rest we know well. Lambeau would stay with the team through the 1949 season, spending a number of years as head coach.

World championships were won in the 1929-31 seasons, 1936, 1939, and 1944, before a dry spell was ended when the Packers hired a New York Giants assistant named Vince Lombardi in 1959 and he won five more titles, including the first two Super Bowls.

Mike Holmgren and Brett Favre led a resurgence in the 90s including a Super Bowl win, while Mike McCarthy and Aaron Rodgers did the same in 2010.

So while we celebrate the accomplishments of the sports world’s only publicly owned team this upcoming season, all the hall of famers from Don Hutson to Bart Starr, Jerry Kramer to Reggie White, a record 13 World Championships, and another season of packed houses at Lambeau Field, lets please remember, lose the 1921 shirts.

I beg you, buy a 100th anniversary shirt, find one that says established 1919. Otherwise that Oct. 3, 1920 3-0 win over the Stambaugh Miners is all but forgotten.

1919-2018, 100 seasons, truly something special, and oh, those darn fairies.
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Commissioner's Corner
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By Scott Walbeck





100 years. Any way you slice it, a century is a significant piece of time. Generations come and go during stretches of 100 years. Technology changes lifestyles significantly, and sports rise and fall in popularity.

With the announcement this week of a multitude of upcoming events and celebrations to mark the Green Bay Packers 100th season, it got me thinking about the team and how truly special its 100 year story is, and about something that really bothered me.

It involves shirts. Specifically, Packers shirts that read established 1921. You see, 1921-2018 is a total of 98 seasons of football, not 100. Why then are the Packers celebrating their centennial this season?

That’s because the Pack was actually established one year before the start of the National Football League in 1919. The NFL itself did not come into existence until 1920, and Green Bay jumped into the league in 1921. So the NFL was established in 1920, the Green Bay Packers joined in 1921 and the shirts are wrong, very wrong.

These two seasons simply cannot be overlooked.

Who could forget about the 85-0 win over the Oshkosh Professionals in 1919, or the devastating season-ending 6-0 loss to the Beloit Fairies that kept Green Bay from an undefeated season? 1920 started with hard fought 3-3 tie with the Chicago Boosters and also ended with only one loss and this time it was those darn Fairies again, this time by a score of 14-3.

Many of you may not know the year, but are familiar with the story. The Packers were organized on Aug. 11, 1919 at yes, a newspaper. Specifically the dingy second-floor editorial rooms of the old Green Bay Press-Gazette building on Cherry Street in downtown Green Bay.

I picture something akin to the upstairs archives of the Antigo Daily Journal, perhaps with an added cloud of cigarette smoke and Fred Berner replaced with Press-Gazette editor George Calhoun, myself swapped out by a slightly better athlete, Earl Curly Lambeau, back home after leaving college at Notre Dame, where he played for the legendary Knute Rockne.

Just two days later in the Aug. 13 edition of the Press-Gazette, the announcement of the team was made, noting the Indian Packing Co., Lambeau’s employer, would sponsor the team and it would be referred to as the Packers. Team colors would be blue and gold, designed to look like the threads donned by Notre Dame.

Prospective players were listed as former standouts at Green Bay East and West high schools, with 20 making the final cut. The Press-Gazette proclaimed, It will be the strongest aggregation of pigskins chasers that has ever been gathered together in this city.

Lambeau would eventually be elected captain of the team, with Calhoun as manager.

And to think urban legend said it all started with a chance encounter at a downtown Green Bay street corner between Lambeau and Calhoun, with Lambeau mentioning starting a semi-pro team, after Calhoun recognized him from his days as a star at East High.

The 1919 and 1920 seasons saw the Packers play mostly against neighboring towns in Wisconsin and the Upper Peninsula of Michigan including the afore mentioned teams, at Hagermeister Park, an open field with no bleachers and fans passing the hat to raise money to keep the team operating.

The NFL, then known as the American Professional Football Association awarded a franchise to Green Bay on Aug. 27, 1921. The Acme Packing Company had purchased the Indian Packing Co. eight months earlier and the team began its pro football run as the Acme Packers.

The rest we know well. Lambeau would stay with the team through the 1949 season, spending a number of years as head coach.

World championships were won in the 1929-31 seasons, 1936, 1939, and 1944, before a dry spell was ended when the Packers hired a New York Giants assistant named Vince Lombardi in 1959 and he won five more titles, including the first two Super Bowls.

Mike Holmgren and Brett Favre led a resurgence in the 90s including a Super Bowl win, while Mike McCarthy and Aaron Rodgers did the same in 2010.

So while we celebrate the accomplishments of the sports world’s only publicly owned team this upcoming season, all the hall of famers from Don Hutson to Bart Starr, Jerry Kramer to Reggie White, a record 13 World Championships, and another season of packed houses at Lambeau Field, lets please remember, lose the 1921 shirts.

I beg you, buy a 100th anniversary shirt, find one that says established 1919. Otherwise that Oct. 3, 1920 3-0 win over the Stambaugh Miners is all but forgotten.

1919-2018, 100 seasons, truly something special, and oh, those darn fairies.
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ANTIGO DAILY
JOURNAL
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Antigo, WI 54409
Phone: 715-623-4191
Fax: 715-623-4193
Mail to: Fred Berner
MapOnUs Location: (local)

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JOURNAL
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Antigo, WI 54409
Phone: 715-623-4191
Fax: 715-623-4193
Mail to: Fred Berner
MapOnUs Location: (local)

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