Antigo Daily Journal
space
space Front Page Calendar & Events Classifieds News Obituaries Opinion/Letters Sports

Breaking News

Commissioner's Corner
space
By Scott Walbeck





Well, here we are. July coming to a close and with it, the end of another summer baseball season. Thoughts will soon turn to gridiron, soccer fields, volleyball and tennis courts of the fall sports season.

I’ve never been big on talking about the seasons. The weather seasons that is, as the seasons to me are not so much spring, summer, fall and winter...but football, hockey, and baseball...or soccer, basketball and tennis...you get it.

But this year, something was bugging me, and I couldn’t quite put my finger on it until I was perusing the pages of social media and ran across a well written article that was being shared among friends of mine. It really stuck a chord.

Most of us have heard the term helicopter parent. A helicopter parent is defined by Google as A parent who takes an overprotective or excessive interest in the life of their child or children.

Typically, you will find them hovering around the fence at a baseball/softball game, coaching from the stands at a basketball game or sitting in the front row at the local play or concert, monitoring their child’s every move. Generally harmless, as the fine line between hovering and supportive is rather blurry. But usually, they are ready to swoop in and grab their child at the first sign of trouble.

A new breed of parent however has now reared their head, known as the Lawnmower parent. A lawnmower parent is defined as A parent who clears all obstacles from their child’s path, so that they never have to deal with any problems by themselves.

Instead of hovering, lawnmower parents clear a path for their child before they even take a step, pre-empting possible problems and ‘mowing’ down obstacles in their child’s way.

I share the terms because the article I ran across is entitled Lawnmower parents: You’re ruining sports.

The article was written by Amanda Goodman. Goodman is an Emmy award winning journalist, who recently left her position at KWWL television, serving the eastern Iowa area, to spend more time with her family. She and her husband are the proud parents of four children.

Anyway here is Amanda’s article-



Dear Lawnmower parents,

Stop. Just stop. Let your kids breathe. Stop trying to control everything. Stop trying to fight every battle. Stop trying to clear the path for everything. Stop holding another kid’s head under water so your kid can stay afloat.  Stop slamming other people’s kids so yours can look better. Stop worrying about what travel team your neighbor is on.  Stop concerning yourself with who made the final cut of the team.  Stop texting and calling all of the parents on your child’s team to try and manipulate things.  Stop emailing your child’s coach at all hours demanding to know why your child didn’t play.  Please stop. You are ruining youth sports.

Look, I get it…youth sports are expensive…you’re paying a lot of money every month…especially if your child is playing year-round.  I guess you want a return on your investment.  But guess what? Everyone on the team is paying the same you are.  Maybe the neighbor kid is just better than yours? I know, I know…it’s tough to swallow.  You may have gotten too use to the equal playing time thing or the huge participation trophies every season.  You aren’t use to seeing your child on the bench.

This is the thing: if every kid is special, then no kid is special.

It may sound harsh…but let it marinate. It’s true.

We can’t keep saying things like this entitlement generation is lazy, if we are the ones who continue to fuel the bad behavior.  If your child gets more playing time because you’re pulling the strings…then your child will lose in the end…they will fail later in life.  Trust me, I’ve seen it.

Our kids need to learn this: Life is unfair at times…hard work ISN’T always rewarded…you don’t always get what you want…nobody owes you anything.

How about we put the lawnmowers away and teach our kids to show up…work hard…have fun…and be a good teammate no matter what.  And how about we sit proudly in the bleachers…and be a spectator. That’s it.

Our kids won’t be able to stand on their own later in life if we don’t let them experience the fall.



I couldn’t have said it better myself. Let your kids be who they are. In some cases, your child might not be good at sports at all (gasp!) and excel in the arts.

Or, heaven forbid, they might not get on the varsity court, field or ice until that last game of their senior season when the coach empties the bench to get all his seniors in.

And, maybe, just maybe, if you do things right. They will have a big smile on their face, because they are happy they got to be part of the team.

Here’s to a great fall in the stands.



The Commish
space

Commissioner's Corner
space
By Scott Walbeck





Well, here we are. July coming to a close and with it, the end of another summer baseball season. Thoughts will soon turn to gridiron, soccer fields, volleyball and tennis courts of the fall sports season.

I’ve never been big on talking about the seasons. The weather seasons that is, as the seasons to me are not so much spring, summer, fall and winter...but football, hockey, and baseball...or soccer, basketball and tennis...you get it.

But this year, something was bugging me, and I couldn’t quite put my finger on it until I was perusing the pages of social media and ran across a well written article that was being shared among friends of mine. It really stuck a chord.

Most of us have heard the term helicopter parent. A helicopter parent is defined by Google as A parent who takes an overprotective or excessive interest in the life of their child or children.

Typically, you will find them hovering around the fence at a baseball/softball game, coaching from the stands at a basketball game or sitting in the front row at the local play or concert, monitoring their child’s every move. Generally harmless, as the fine line between hovering and supportive is rather blurry. But usually, they are ready to swoop in and grab their child at the first sign of trouble.

A new breed of parent however has now reared their head, known as the Lawnmower parent. A lawnmower parent is defined as A parent who clears all obstacles from their child’s path, so that they never have to deal with any problems by themselves.

Instead of hovering, lawnmower parents clear a path for their child before they even take a step, pre-empting possible problems and ‘mowing’ down obstacles in their child’s way.

I share the terms because the article I ran across is entitled Lawnmower parents: You’re ruining sports.

The article was written by Amanda Goodman. Goodman is an Emmy award winning journalist, who recently left her position at KWWL television, serving the eastern Iowa area, to spend more time with her family. She and her husband are the proud parents of four children.

Anyway here is Amanda’s article-



Dear Lawnmower parents,

Stop. Just stop. Let your kids breathe. Stop trying to control everything. Stop trying to fight every battle. Stop trying to clear the path for everything. Stop holding another kid’s head under water so your kid can stay afloat.  Stop slamming other people’s kids so yours can look better. Stop worrying about what travel team your neighbor is on.  Stop concerning yourself with who made the final cut of the team.  Stop texting and calling all of the parents on your child’s team to try and manipulate things.  Stop emailing your child’s coach at all hours demanding to know why your child didn’t play.  Please stop. You are ruining youth sports.

Look, I get it…youth sports are expensive…you’re paying a lot of money every month…especially if your child is playing year-round.  I guess you want a return on your investment.  But guess what? Everyone on the team is paying the same you are.  Maybe the neighbor kid is just better than yours? I know, I know…it’s tough to swallow.  You may have gotten too use to the equal playing time thing or the huge participation trophies every season.  You aren’t use to seeing your child on the bench.

This is the thing: if every kid is special, then no kid is special.

It may sound harsh…but let it marinate. It’s true.

We can’t keep saying things like this entitlement generation is lazy, if we are the ones who continue to fuel the bad behavior.  If your child gets more playing time because you’re pulling the strings…then your child will lose in the end…they will fail later in life.  Trust me, I’ve seen it.

Our kids need to learn this: Life is unfair at times…hard work ISN’T always rewarded…you don’t always get what you want…nobody owes you anything.

How about we put the lawnmowers away and teach our kids to show up…work hard…have fun…and be a good teammate no matter what.  And how about we sit proudly in the bleachers…and be a spectator. That’s it.

Our kids won’t be able to stand on their own later in life if we don’t let them experience the fall.



I couldn’t have said it better myself. Let your kids be who they are. In some cases, your child might not be good at sports at all (gasp!) and excel in the arts.

Or, heaven forbid, they might not get on the varsity court, field or ice until that last game of their senior season when the coach empties the bench to get all his seniors in.

And, maybe, just maybe, if you do things right. They will have a big smile on their face, because they are happy they got to be part of the team.

Here’s to a great fall in the stands.



The Commish
space
2017
Wisconsin Public Notice Search
Wisconsin Public Notice Search

space
ANTIGO DAILY
JOURNAL
612 Superior Street
Antigo, WI 54409
Phone: 715-623-4191
Fax: 715-623-4193
Mail to: Fred Berner
MapOnUs Location: (local)

WEEKLY
JOURNAL
EXPRESS
612 Superior Street,
Antigo, WI 54409
Phone: 715-623-4191
Fax: 715-623-4193
Mail to: Fred Berner
MapOnUs Location: (local)

*Member WNA & NNA

space
Quick
News Search

Enter Key Word
space
space

Material on this web site has a
copyright by Antigo Daily Journal.
All rights reserved.
© 2000-2017
space