Antigo Daily Journal
space
space Front Page Calendar & Events Classifieds News Obituaries Opinion/Letters Sports

Breaking News

Habitat completes another nice residence
space
Kyle and Amber Crum signed the purchase papers for their first-ever home this morning, but the celebration started early.

Thrivent Builds Mid-Wisconsin Chapter, together with the Langlade County Chapter of Habitat for Humanity, held an open house at the Crum’s newly constructed home at 156 Berner Street on Saturday, drawing friends, family members, volunteers and the curious.

“This is the only open house I’ve been to where the people brought house-warming gifts,’” Gary Whitman, Habitat’s Building Committee chairman, said. “It was filled with Kyle and Amber’s family and friends.”

“It was a great build,” Gary Kieper of Thrivent Financial said. “As you are going along, you always wonder if it is going to get done, but everything always comes together and the house is complete. It has excellent workmanship, is well done and very appealing. Everyone was very impressed.”

The afternoon included a dedication and blessing, the open house and an evening banquet.

Habitat has constructed seven homes in Antigo and is already in the initial stages of finding a family for 2014. Thrivent, through its Thrivent Builds program, has been involved in four of the projects, contributing $226,600, including $55,000 for the Crum home, and Kieper said the Mid-Wisconsin Chapter is hoping for the funds for number five as well.

In addition to Whitman as the building chairman, key volunteers included Duff Leaver, site manager, and a volunteer crew that included Alycia Fetterly, Peter Higgins, Ken Castaldi, Carl McIlquham, Marv Schmeiser, Dave Schefhauser and Sam Hardin.

“We really owe those people, and all the volunteers, a special thanks,” Kieper said.

All of the Habitat projects are special, Whitman said, and each home is tailored to the needs of the client. In the Crum’s case, that included making the home entirely handicapped accessible, and constructing it out of super-strong, energy-efficient concrete able to withstand any storm.

Don Rudolph of TF Forming Systems Inc. of Green Bay, a manufacturer of insulated concrete forms, brought his crew over to teach volunteers the technique and used the project to film a training video.

“It turned out very well,” Whitman said. “We had their expertise on site with us.”

The ThermoForm construction system was chosen because Kyle is in a wheelchair, unable to enter and exit the security of a basement in the event of a tornado, and to provide volunteers with some new skills.

While Amber’s time at Habitat was limited somewhat by her employment, Kyle was on site most days, providing the sweat equity that served as a portion of the home’s down payment.

Construction costs of a concrete house are about 5 to 7 percent higher than a conventional, stick-built home, but those dollars can be recouped quickly through energy savings since the homes are 25 to 50 percent more efficient.

And with the concrete encased on the rigid insulation, exterior and interior appearances are the same as a conventional home.

While this type of construction is new to the area, it is quickly gaining favor across the nation, especially in regions of the Midwest that have been lashed by tornadoes.

Although the closing was days away, the Crums were already serving as good hosts at the open house, welcoming family and friends, including two of Kyle’s schoolteachers, and stating repeatedly how thrilled they were with the home.

“They were a nice young couple to work with,” Whitman said. “They felt very comfortable there already.”

“He’s got a great group of friends who really helped out at the house,” Kieper added.

Habitat for Humanity of Langlade County is a locally-run affiliate of Habitat for Humanity International, a nonprofit, ecumenical Christian housing organization. Habitat for Humanity works in partnership with people in need to build and renovate decent, affordable housing. The houses then are sold to those in need at no profit and with no interest charged.

Volunteers provide most of the labor, and individual and corporate donors provide money and materials to build Habitat houses. Partner families themselves invest hundreds of hours of labor—"sweat equity"—into building their homes and the homes of others. Their mortgage payments go into a revolving fund that is used to build more houses.

Habitat is currently accepting applications for its next project.

The basic family selection criteria for a home includes need, income, the ability to repay the interest-free mortgage, and a willingness to partner as a participant with Habitat.

Applicants must also be Langlade County residents.


space

Amber and Kyle Crum in their new home, surrounded by some of the people who were involved in the Habitat for Humanity, Thrivent Builds summer-long project.

Habitat completes another nice residence
space
Kyle and Amber Crum signed the purchase papers for their first-ever home this morning, but the celebration started early.

Thrivent Builds Mid-Wisconsin Chapter, together with the Langlade County Chapter of Habitat for Humanity, held an open house at the Crum’s newly constructed home at 156 Berner Street on Saturday, drawing friends, family members, volunteers and the curious.

“This is the only open house I’ve been to where the people brought house-warming gifts,’” Gary Whitman, Habitat’s Building Committee chairman, said. “It was filled with Kyle and Amber’s family and friends.”

“It was a great build,” Gary Kieper of Thrivent Financial said. “As you are going along, you always wonder if it is going to get done, but everything always comes together and the house is complete. It has excellent workmanship, is well done and very appealing. Everyone was very impressed.”

The afternoon included a dedication and blessing, the open house and an evening banquet.

Habitat has constructed seven homes in Antigo and is already in the initial stages of finding a family for 2014. Thrivent, through its Thrivent Builds program, has been involved in four of the projects, contributing $226,600, including $55,000 for the Crum home, and Kieper said the Mid-Wisconsin Chapter is hoping for the funds for number five as well.

In addition to Whitman as the building chairman, key volunteers included Duff Leaver, site manager, and a volunteer crew that included Alycia Fetterly, Peter Higgins, Ken Castaldi, Carl McIlquham, Marv Schmeiser, Dave Schefhauser and Sam Hardin.

“We really owe those people, and all the volunteers, a special thanks,” Kieper said.

All of the Habitat projects are special, Whitman said, and each home is tailored to the needs of the client. In the Crum’s case, that included making the home entirely handicapped accessible, and constructing it out of super-strong, energy-efficient concrete able to withstand any storm.

Don Rudolph of TF Forming Systems Inc. of Green Bay, a manufacturer of insulated concrete forms, brought his crew over to teach volunteers the technique and used the project to film a training video.

“It turned out very well,” Whitman said. “We had their expertise on site with us.”

The ThermoForm construction system was chosen because Kyle is in a wheelchair, unable to enter and exit the security of a basement in the event of a tornado, and to provide volunteers with some new skills.

While Amber’s time at Habitat was limited somewhat by her employment, Kyle was on site most days, providing the sweat equity that served as a portion of the home’s down payment.

Construction costs of a concrete house are about 5 to 7 percent higher than a conventional, stick-built home, but those dollars can be recouped quickly through energy savings since the homes are 25 to 50 percent more efficient.

And with the concrete encased on the rigid insulation, exterior and interior appearances are the same as a conventional home.

While this type of construction is new to the area, it is quickly gaining favor across the nation, especially in regions of the Midwest that have been lashed by tornadoes.

Although the closing was days away, the Crums were already serving as good hosts at the open house, welcoming family and friends, including two of Kyle’s schoolteachers, and stating repeatedly how thrilled they were with the home.

“They were a nice young couple to work with,” Whitman said. “They felt very comfortable there already.”

“He’s got a great group of friends who really helped out at the house,” Kieper added.

Habitat for Humanity of Langlade County is a locally-run affiliate of Habitat for Humanity International, a nonprofit, ecumenical Christian housing organization. Habitat for Humanity works in partnership with people in need to build and renovate decent, affordable housing. The houses then are sold to those in need at no profit and with no interest charged.

Volunteers provide most of the labor, and individual and corporate donors provide money and materials to build Habitat houses. Partner families themselves invest hundreds of hours of labor—"sweat equity"—into building their homes and the homes of others. Their mortgage payments go into a revolving fund that is used to build more houses.

Habitat is currently accepting applications for its next project.

The basic family selection criteria for a home includes need, income, the ability to repay the interest-free mortgage, and a willingness to partner as a participant with Habitat.

Applicants must also be Langlade County residents.


space

Amber and Kyle Crum in their new home, surrounded by some of the people who were involved in the Habitat for Humanity, Thrivent Builds summer-long project.
2017 space
ANTIGO DAILY
JOURNAL
612 Superior Street
Antigo, WI 54409
Phone: 715-623-4191
Fax: 715-623-4193
Mail to: Fred Berner
MapOnUs Location: (local)

WEEKLY
JOURNAL
EXPRESS
612 Superior Street,
Antigo, WI 54409
Phone: 715-623-4191
Fax: 715-623-4193
Mail to: Fred Berner
MapOnUs Location: (local)

*Member WNA & NNA

space
Quick
News Search

Enter Key Word
space
space


Material on this web site has a
copyright by Antigo Daily Journal.
All rights reserved.
© 2000-2017
space