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Stovewood building celebration marked Saturday in Jennings, food, fun offered
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Go back to the days of logging lore at Stovewood Daze slated Saturday at the Mecikalski Stovewood Building in Jennings.

The historical site will host a day full of activities, all dating to the early settlement of the northwoods. Activities will run from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

There will be an old-fashioned pig roast cooked by Don Sparks, beer, soda and plenty of food.

Antique tractors, cars and engines will be on display and a bake sale is also planned.

Tom Sikora will be on hand sawing lumber on his bandmill and Mike Monte, author of “Cut & Run, Loggin’ Off the Big Woods,” will discuss logging history.

Music will be provided by Ray Ehlinger.

The museum will also be open for tours.

The stovewood building, a National Historic Site, was constructed with a unique method of folk architecture also known as cordwood construction. Built at the turn of the century, it is the only known commercial example utilizing the stovewood building method in the United States.

The structure was constructed by John Mecikalski in the late 1880s. It was restored by the Kohler Foundation 100 years later and gifted to the town of Schoepke in a public ceremony on June 20, 1987.

Also referred to as “cord wood,” “wood block,” and “stackwall” architecture, stovewood architecture is characterized by short-cut logs stacked and joined by mortar or clay. In the Mecikalski Stovewood Building, 18-inch lengths of cedar logs were laid in a bed of wet lime mortar. The finished wall resembled a stacked woodpile, unlike more conventional long-cut timber structures in which the logs are set to run the length of the wall.

The advantage here is that while traditional log-cabin type structures required long, straight logs, the economical and practical stovewood construction made use of irregular, short lengths—often leftovers from cut logs or otherwise undesirable wood. Stovewood construction was thus considered appropriate for barns and outbuildings -—over 60 stovewood structures dot Wisconsin’s countryside.

What makes the Mecikalski Stovewood Building unique and worthy of landmark status is its size, coupled with the multiplicity of commercial and personal uses.

The museum is located on Highway B east of Pelican Lake.


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The Mecikalski Stovewood Building in Jennings will host Stovewood Daze Saturday.
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612 Superior Street,
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Phone: 715-623-4191
Fax: 715-623-4193
Mail to: Fred Berner
MapOnUs Location: (local)

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