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Ground broken for new Habitat home
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David and Theresa Ferrel, joined by Habitat for Humanity volunteers and board members, sent the dirt flying Monday, officially getting construction underway on their new home at 1126 Lincoln St.

The ceremony marked the start of the 2015 project, continuing a Habitat tradition of providing homes to families in need in exchange for no-interest loans and plenty of sweat equity.

“We hope to have them in by Christmas, like we did with last year’s family, which will be dependent on the number of volunteers we have on-site to complete the projected construction schedule,” Paul Grinde, president of Habitat for Humanity of Langlade County, said.

The home is being financed in part through a $55,000 donation through Thrivent Builds, a program of Thrivent Financial. Since 2007, Thrivent has donated $341,600.00 to assist the local Habitat organization in constructing homes for deserving families.

The house will be a conventional stick-built structure with three bedrooms and will be completely handicapped accessible. Shannon Rasmussen donated the house design and plans. Warren Wagner is serving as construction supervisor.

The Ferrels will be joined in th
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David and Theresa Ferrel, at center, are flanked by volunteers and Habitat for Humanity board members at Monday’s ground-breaking for their new home on Lincoln Street.
Fairgrounds was a very busy place
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Rhonda Klement, coordinator of the Langlade County Fair, was tired after the exposition closed Sunday night, but she viewed the experience with great satisfaction.

“We are working to become a family event,” she said, “and it is really working.” The fair got underway Wednesday and ran through Sunday afternoon with fine weather and massive crowds.

“We had a lot of people here,” she said, adding that many of the food vendors ran out of food after just a few days.

“I don’t think there was a hamburger bun in a store,” Klement said.

Of course, there were a number of successes which most would expect. The sprint car races Friday night saw a big crowd, despite an early-evening rain shower. And the demolition derby on Saturday night usually always sells out, and this year was no exception.

“The demo crowd was a little rowdy,” Klement said, but there were really no problems. But they were having quite a time booing and cheering from the stands when they were not satisfied with the officials’ calls.

She said there was only one scuffle after the evening, and that was between two ladies.

The parking lots were more than full and the overf
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One of the fair's rides for the younger visitors chugged along Saturday evening on the midway.
Midway tent hosted big shows, excellent entertainment at the fair
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The midway tent is traditionally one of the Langlade County Fair’s most popular features, and nothing changed this year.

“It was busy every night,” the fair coordinator Rhonda Klement said when it all had ended.

The Vic Ferreri Band was the big draw Friday night packing the entire area of the tent and surrounding it.

Klement said the Elks Lodge, which runs the bar under the tent, sold 36 half barrels of beer during the four hours that Vic Ferrari was on stage. That’s thousands and thousands of 10-ounce cups.

The band’s front man, Mike Bailey, enjoyed the switch from Thursday to Friday night because of the size of the crowd and enthusiasm.

“The crowd was with them,” Klement said, and all bands like that.

The crowd was also good for the Southern Gypsy Band, which is making its last fair appearance as it is disbanding at the end of the year.

And on Sunday, the Looney Lutherans enjoyed an exceptional turnout under the awning as they poked gentle fun at a variety of northwoods traditions.

Klement said the fair is placing more emphasis on the family aspect of the exposition and it could be seen in some of the activities pl
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Two of the characters from the "Looney Lutheran'' performance ham it up.
Spirited bidders at market animal sale
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Bid numbers were flying at the Langlade County Fair’s market animal sale Friday night, as businesses and individuals vied for some of the area’s finest livestock raised and shown by outstanding youth exhibitors.

“I say it every year, but this really is the Kentucky Derby of animal sales,” auctioneer Duke Packard of North Central Sales Auctions Inc., said. “The best of the best are here. Have a little fun, bid on some animals, and enjoy the fair.”

The bidders listened, and the first animal through the ring—the grand champion sheep shown by Olivia Wolf—quickly sparked a bidding war between Schroeder Bros. and Pond-Hill Processing.

“It’s a dog fight at the Langlade County Fair,” Packard said.

By the time the gavel came down, Pond Hill was the winner at $9.75 per pound, with Kurt Klinner signing the ticket.

“Johnny,” the sheep, isn’t going anywhere soon. The animal is headed to the Wisconsin State Fair.

In 2014, the grand champion sheep was exhibited by Jodi Wolf, and brought $5.50 per pound from Langlade Ford.

While the first sheep provided some great starting entertainment, the real excitement arrived when Matt Bowman brought hi
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Duke Packard spurs on bidding for Matt Bowman’s grand champion steer Friday at the Langlade County Fair Market Animal Sale.
Habitat will break ground on new home
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David and Theresa Ferrel were selected as this year’s Habitat for Humanity’s partner family and will break ground for their new home at 1126 Lincoln Street Monday.

The ceremony is slated for at 12:15 p.m. They will be accompanied by volunteers and associates of Habitat for Humanity of Langlade County.  

“Theresa and I are overwhelmed and excited to be chosen as the 2015 Habitat for Humanity family for this year’s home,” Ferrel said. “This is a miracle from God. We give God all the glory for this miracle”

They plan to move in their new home by December of this year, with their daughter Casey and an expected newborn grandchild.

“We hope to have them in by Christmas, like we did with last year’s family, which will be dependent on the number of volunteers we have onsite to complete the projected construction schedule,” Paul Grinde, chairman of Habitat for Humanity of Langlade County, said.

The home is being financed in part through a $55,000 donation through Thrivent Builds, a program of Thrivent Financial. Since 2007, Thrivent has donated $341,600.00 to assist the local Habitat organization in constructing homes for deserving families.
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David and Theresa Ferrel, the recipients of the Habitat for Humanity home. Ground-breaking is Monday.
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