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World War I explored at Society banquet
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A historic Antigo location—The Hoffman House—was the venue for the Langlade County Historical Society’s annual banquet Thursday.

The event brought over 80 guests to the refurbished hotel, which has been purchased by Tom and Brady Koss. They enjoyed a catered meal prepared by Fifth Avenue Restaurant and Lounge, plus a program on the 107th Trench Mortar Battery, the famed Antigo military unit that took part in several key battles of World War I, led by Historical Society President Joe Hermolin.

While the venue, an Antigo landmark since 1884, was the star of the evening, Hermolin’s remarks resurrected a time of overwhelming community patriotism and civic pride.

Hermolin tied his remarks to the centenary of World War I, which began in Europe in 1914. The United States entered three years later, taking part in the fighting until the signing of the armistice on Nov. 11, 1918.

The Trench Mortar Battery was formed in 1917 as a National Guard unit, known as Company G, easily recruiting 191 young men to serve. They trained in the Antigo Opera House, purchased by John Hanousek and donated to the community for an armory.

The unit trained first at Camp D
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WORLD WAR I—Two Voyageurs Militaire from Langlade County Voiture 1204, 40 et 8, Steve Bradley and Jack Eaton, look over memorabilia from the 107th Trench Mortar Battery with Langlade County Historical Society President Joe Hermolin Thursday. The 40 et 8 organization dates to World War I, the focus of Hermolin’s talk at the annual banquet. Voyageur Walt Wess also attended.
Traditional hunt draws near
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The clock is ticking toward the opener of the 2014 gun deer season, a fall tradition that brings thousands of hunters to the northwoods.

According to officials with the Department of Natural Resources, hunting is an important contributor to Wisconsin’s economy as well as an historical and culturally significant pastime. Eighty-eight percent of hunters participated in deer hunting in 2011, making it the most popular form of hunting in the state by a wide margin.

Those hunters hitting the northwoods this year can expect a mixed bag, both of weather and of the chances for success, according to Eric Borchert, DNR wildlife technician based in Antigo.

“The opener looks fairly decent as far as weather,” Borchert said. “The snow is a blessing, but the swamps and wetlands remain very wet and access is going to be a challenge in some areas.”

But hunters getting into those prime areas may find fewer, and smaller bucks.

“The deer population really took a hit,” Borchert said. “The population is relatively low.”

Last winter’s severity index of 156, a number based on temperatures and snow depth, was in the “very severe” range, and that took its
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Dallas and Becky Moe of Antigo lace up their boots in preparation for Saturday’s gun deer season opener.
White Lake board eyes another referendum vote
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The White Lake school district is facing very limited options, and could look very different or perhaps even cease to exist, in the wake of a failed November spending referendum.

That was the message at Tuesday’s board of education meeting, held before a full house of interested residents and dominated by a discussion of what do now.

Earlier this month, voters for the second time rebuffed the board’s request to spend $250,000 annually for the next three years above and beyond state-imposed revenue limits. The money would have replaced a referendum that expired at the end of the 2013-14 term.

Board President Scott Popelka, who said he was “disappointed and shocked” by the defeat, said options are limited.

“There is really nothing we can cut without drastically destroying the school experience,” he said. “If we cut out all electives and after-school activities, I don’t feel it would be a school anymore.”

Instead, Popelka said the board is leaning toward holding another referendum, likely in April, and embarking on a long-term effort to get accurate financial details to voters to combat misinformation.

“As a board, we have to do a be
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Agreeable meeting for County Board
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The Langlade County Board of Supervisors was in an agreeable pre-holiday frame of mine Tuesday when it approved several resolutions and an ordinance on unanimous votes.

The agenda for the session was fairly quiet and featuring two visiting speakers, took a bit less than two hours.

With three members absent, the supervisors approved a collective bargaining agreement for the county’s Law Enforcement Association covering 2015.

The proposal was adopted by a unanimous vote.

The estimated cost of the pact comes to an additional $15,421 per year. The cost of living increase for the year is 1.57 percent and there is another $350 as a uniform allowance.

In another salary and benefits resolution, the supervisors backed a revised system of funding for employees using what is called a matrix/adjustments were made for 2015 s costing the county $57,341 for the year. The extra funds will come from the contingency fund, highways and grants.

In another annual action, the board will likely take titles to delinquent tax lands for the 2011 year. Notices are being sent to the people whose assets are listed as not paid and then they have three months to
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Langlade Hospital recongized as top performer in key quality areas
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Langlade Hospital has been recognized as a 2013 Top Performer on Key Quality Measures by The Joint Commission, the leading accreditor of health care organizations in the United States.

Langlade Hospital was recognized as part of The Joint Commission’s 2014 annual report “America’s Hospitals: Improving Quality and Safety,” for attaining and sustaining excellence in accountability measure performance for pneumonia and surgical care. It is one of 1,224 hospitals in the United States to achieve the 2013 Top Performer distinction.

“We understand what matters most to patients at Langlade Hospital is the quality and safety of the care they receive,” Sherry Bunten, director of patient care services, said. “ That is why we have made it a top priority to improve positive patient outcomes through evidence-based care processes.”

The Top Performer program recognizes hospitals for improving performance on evidence-based interventions that increase the chances of healthy outcomes for patients with certain conditions, including heart attack, heart failure, pneumonia, surgical care, children’s asthma, stroke, venous thromboembolism and perinatal care, as well as for inpat
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Langlade Hospital staff representing departments in medical/surgical/ICU, birthing center and surgery.
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ANTIGO DAILY
JOURNAL
612 Superior Street
Antigo, WI 54409
Phone: 715-623-4191
Fax: 715-623-4193
Mail to: Fred Berner
MapOnUs Location: (local)

WEEKLY
JOURNAL
EXPRESS
612 Superior Street,
Antigo, WI 54409
Phone: 715-623-4191
Fax: 715-623-4193
Mail to: Fred Berner
MapOnUs Location: (local)

*Member WNA & NNA

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